Dark Wood Farm FAQ

This past week, while I was out of town for wedding festivities, I caught up with a bunch of old friends.  They had lots of questions about my farm, so I thought that this might be a great opportunity to answer those questions for a broader audience.  Let’s call it a little Dark Wood Farm FAQ.


How’s the farming going?

It’s going well!  It’s a lot of hard work, it keeps me busy, and I’m not getting a lot of sleep at the moment, but I fully expect to make up some of that sleep this winter.  I really like being my own boss and being outside everyday.  I feel really strong and healthy, and I’m learning so much about growing vegetables through trial and error.


What’s your favorite part of farming so far?

I love cooking food that I grew myself, and I love sharing my vegetables with family and friends.  Cooking is a joy for me, and using such fresh, wholesome ingredients makes a huge difference in the quality of my meals.  My family and friends are trying all kinds of new veggies out my garden and eating more fresh produce than normal, which really makes me happy.  I also love talking to people at the farmers market, sharing recipes, and explaining what to do with all the odd vegetables I grow.


What are you going to do this winter?

Hopefully I will get some much-needed rest and do some traveling, but I’ll probably have to pick up a holiday job to make a little extra money.  I will also have lots to keep me busy: planning next year’s crops, ordering seeds, cleaning and fixing equipment, and building new gadgets and infrastructure to make farm work easier!


Are you making any money?

Talking about money is awkward, especially when you’re starting a new business, but I think it’s important to talk about it so that consumers are aware of how hard farmers work and how little they get paid.  I’m sure we all wish food was free, but we live in a world where most people don’t grow their own food, so the people that do grow food need to be compensated for the hard work they do to keep everyone fed with nutritious, safe, and delicious food.  Yes, I am making money at the farmers markets, but I don’t know yet if I’ll recover all my expenses this year.  At the beginning of the year, I bought a bunch of equipment and supplies to get me started, plus I always have my monthly rent and utility bills for the farm.  It would be amazing if I could make everything back this year and have a little left over to pay myself, but most new businesses don’t make money in their first year because of all the upfront equipment costs.  I’ll be able to answer this question a little better at the end of the year.  Suffice it to say, I have a lot of vegetables to sell and I am selling them, but I don’t expect to get rich this year or any other year, for that matter.  Farming is not a lucrative business, but most farmers don’t farm because they’re hoping to strike it rich.


Do you own the farm?

No, I am leasing the farm this year.  The farm belongs to the Mays family, whom I have known for almost 15 years.  They are leasing me the land where I grow the vegetables, plus a trailer on the property where I live.  I also get to use the tractor and farm implements, and I can harvest from the existing apple trees, blackberry bushes, and strawberry and asparagus patches.  I hope to have my own farm one day, but leasing is the best option for me as a first-time farmer.  Without the burden of a mortgage, I can figure out if I will be able to farm full time without another income source, if there’s a market for the kinds of vegetables I want to grow, and if I am capable of growing said vegetables in Northern Kentucky’s soils and climate.  I learned most of my farming skills in Washington and California, both of which have very different growing conditions than here.  It is also extremely helpful to have some existing equipment on hand because it has aided in keeping my first year costs down while I figure out how to run my farming business.


How big is the farm?

The entire farm is roughly 35 acres, most of which is hilly and wooded.  The parcel where I grow everything is just under 2 acres.  Some of that 2 acres is taken up with grassy headlands, trees along the edges, my greenhouse, and a blackberry patch, so the actual area that I am tilling to grow annual vegetables is 1 acre.


Is your family glad to have you home?

That’s a question best answered by my family, but I am pretty sure they are happy to have me home.  I have been away from Kentucky for 10 years, and while it feels like a big change to come home, it also doesn’t.  My family and friends have been so wonderfully supportive that it has been pretty easy to pick up where I left off.  Sure, I miss my friends in Seattle, but I also miss my friends from New York, and friends that are now scattered all over the country.  I wish I could scoop them all up and bring them to my farm so we can all live together, but that’s not very realistic.  Luckily, with the support of my friends and family here in Kentucky, I was able to take a little vacation to the West Coast for a wedding in mid-July when the farm was in full swing.  I hope I will always be able to take trips like that, and I feel pretty blessed to have friends waiting with open arms wherever I go.


​My garden, Dark Wood Farm, in full bloom in July.
​My garden, Dark Wood Farm, in full bloom in July.