After the Market

The past few weeks at the farmers market have been the busiest of the year.  There are a few factors contributing to this, as far as I can tell.  With cooler-than-normal temperatures this summer, folks have been out enjoying the weather and spending a little extra time at the market, especially now that it’s corn, tomato, and watermelon season.  There are so many beloved summer vegetables ripe and ready right now that it is truly the best time of year to visit the market.  Chris and I have spent some long days harvesting in preparation for the busy July and August markets, and every time we pack up the truck to head to the market, I am amazed that we are able to fit everything.  We like to keep our booth stocked for the duration of the market, rather than run out of things early, which means we often come home with leftover vegetables.  When I worked at Local Roots Farm in Seattle, leftover vegetables weren’t a problem.  We had an honor system farm stand on the road where we could sell nice leftover vegetables, and anything that was wilted could go to our laying hens or pigs.  Here at Dark Wood Farm, I don’t have a farm stand, and we don’t have any farm animals except for Smudge the cat, and she’s not too keen on leftover chard.  So you might be wondering what we do with our leftover veggies, and the answer is – we do lots of things!  Chris and I both love to cook, so in the days following a farmers market, we prioritize cooking with the items left over from market.  For example, today I used up one bunch of sorrel, a bunch of chard, three onions, some leeks, a tomato, and several peppers, and that was only for one meal – lunch!


Tomato Salad
​Part of our lunch today: heirloom tomato, bell peppers, and seared padrone peppers with sea salt.


Whatever we don’t eat either gets stored, sold, donated, composted, or preserved.  Here’s a little bit about each of these avenues:

Some leftover items, like potatoes, will store perfectly fine until our next market in a few days, so we hang on to those.  The tricky part about holding vegetables until the next market is finding a good place to store them.  Each vegetable has a preferred temperature and humidity, so you often can’t store everything in one place.  Some veggies need to be refrigerated, some don’t.  Most of them need to be kept out of the sun and out of the reaches of rodents or other animals looking for a feast.

Some of the higher demand items get sold to friends, family, and neighbors, especially the ones that live along the road between the market and the farm.  From time to time, the Rabbit Hash General Store, just 3 miles down the road, will sell some of my nice leftover goods.  We also donate lots of greens and other perishable items to a food pantry run by CAIN – Churches Active in Northside.  They pick up the veggies right at the end of our Wednesday market in Northside, then stock their pantry for guests on Thursday morning.

Surprisingly, when all is said and done, we have very little vegetable matter leftover to compost.  I started two compost bins when I moved onto the farm in January.  They are simply cylinders of wire mesh with a few support poles.  They are each three feet tall and a foot and a half wide.  I dump vegetable scraps inside the cylinder and then top it with a handful or two of carbonaceous or “brown” material like dry leaves.  Lately, I have been using some of the chaff I winnowed off of my mustard crop mixed with some cocoa bean husks that I picked up from the new chocolate shop at Findlay Market, Maverick Chocolate.  These dry materials help balance out the wet, nitrogenous food and veggie scraps and keep the compost smelling pleasant.  I’m 8 months in, and the first cylinder is only about 60% full!  As all the microbes and insects quickly work their way through the compost during the heat of the summer, the volume compresses, even though Chris and I are adding a couple bowls of fresh material every day.

Compost bin
One of our compost bins, holding 8 months worth of compost!

For me, the most exciting aspect of market leftovers at the moment is the opportunity it provides to squirrel food away for the winter.  This past winter, when I first moved onto the farm, my pantry was bare except for a few winter squash, shallots, garlic, and root vegetables that I stowed away in little nooks and crannies of my car when I left Local Roots and moved home to Kentucky.  Luckily, I quickly befriended some local farmers including Barry at Red Sunflower Farm, and he was kind enough to share some frozen beans, squash, and canned tomatoes to help me get through the winter until the first asparagus and rhubarb peeked through this spring.  Now that my farm is in full abundance, I intend on stocking my pantry for the winter so that I can eat some healthy farm foods even when the ground is frozen.  A couple weeks ago, I wrote about drying herbs and saving mustard seed, and I mentioned how I had been putting off canning because of how hot it makes the kitchen.  Now that tomato season is here, I’ve had to suck it up and deal with the heat in the kitchen.  At the end of each market, I normally have some dented and bruised tomatoes that didn’t survive the truck ride to the market, so they have been going into the canning pot then onto my shelf for making chili and tomato-y beans and greens this winter.

cooking a pot of tomatoes
​A pot of roma and heirloom tomatoes cooking down before being packed into jars for canning.
​Pulling finished jars of tomato out of my great grandma's pressure cooker from 1961.
​Pulling finished jars of tomato out of my great grandma’s pressure cooker from 1961.
Summer in jars - my mom's canned green beans and my canned crushed tomatoes.
Summer in jars – my mom’s canned green beans and my canned crushed tomatoes.

I am growing a small Italian heirloom tomato called Principe Borghese, which no one seems to want to buy.  I decided to try growing it when I read in the seed catalog, “used for sun-dried tomatoes as it has few seeds and little juice.” Sun-dried tomatoes! YES! I love sun-dried tomatoes, so I was sure that several of my market customers would be excited about a tomato that is exceptional for drying.  Well, my instincts perhaps were wrong, because I normally bring home 75% of the Principe Borghese tomatoes that I pick.  I’m not worried about it, though, because it takes me about 10 minutes to cut up the leftover Principe tomatoes and put them in the dehydrator, then in 48 hours I have a jar full of aromatic sun-dried tomatoes.

​Sun-dried Principe Borghese tomatoes bound for some winter pasta and pizza.
​Sun-dried Principe Borghese tomatoes bound for some winter pasta and pizza.

My latest experiment in food preservation is homemade hot sauce.  I am bringing two types of hot peppers to the market currently: green jalapenos and fish peppers.  They have been selling so-so, and after Wednesday’s market, I had a pint of each that no one bought so I decided to try making green hot sauce.  Following this recipe online, I chopped the peppers in my food processor with some salt, then transferred the hot pepper puree to a jar to ferment overnight.  The next day, I added vinegar, and I am currently letting it sit for a week to develop flavors before I will sieve out the pepper chunks and put the liquid hot sauce into a bottle.

 ​Jalapeno and fish hot peppers; hot sauce in the making!

​Jalapeno and fish hot peppers; hot sauce in the making!


Hot peppers pureed with salt, fermenting into hot sauce.
Hot peppers pureed with salt, fermenting into hot sauce.

​Instead of looking at my leftover market vegetables as a burden, I choose to look at them as a challenge.  How can I find more outlets for my vegetables, how can I improve my composting system, which new recipes can I explore, and how can I preserve these vegetables so I have food from my own farm when fresh vegetables are out of season?  I am learning so much from these challenges, and setting myself up to have a winter with fewer trips to the grocery store, so I am thankful for the overabundance.